Inktober Day 3: The Shaggy Beast!

I have covered The Shaggy Beast several times here on WC; it’s one of my favorite dragons of folklore(this time I gave it four legs instead of two). And here it is again for  #Inktober! 🙂

Shaggy Beast.jpg

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A Trip to Build-a-Bear yields….DRAGONS!

A few weeks ago, I learned that John Kassir, the voice of The Cryptkeeper, was performing the voice of Elliott in the remake of Pete’s Dragon. Being a lover of most things dragonish and also someone who is deeply sentimental over the original Elliott, I was a little skeptical about this remake. Now, the more I see trailers, the more positive I feel about the film and I think I’ll take a gander at it in the theater.
What also gave me a push was when Kassir posted on Facebook about a stuffed toy Elliott, (including a photo).
It is offered at Build-a-Bear stores.
Oh. My. Stars.

I was hoping to ask for Elliott as a Halloween present (since I treat Halloween a bit too much like Christmas) but I finally couldn’t stand the suspense. Plus, I wanted to visit Yankeee Candle to see their new Halloween offerings, and both stores are in the Mall of Georgia. Because the Mall is overflowing with tons of other strip malls outside of it and traffic is insane, I really had to prime myself, gather snacks, fill up the car, and take serious time out of a day off to go there, kind of like planning an expedition to Everest. Anyway, once I got there, I was not disappointed.

 

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Dragons of Europe:The Zmaj of Serbia!

Zmaji Book.jpg

In Serbia, the zmaj is revered(usually) as a benevolent being that is similar to the dragons of East Asia. A common description of these dragons states that they  have a ram’s head and a serpent’s body. In addition to having great strength and wisdom, they are said to protect the people from the Ala, or Azjada, another creature that was  believed to bring bad weather and storms that destroy crops.

The zmaj are also reputed to be able to take on different forms, including those of human beings. In human form, they were able to engage in one their favorite pastimes–the pursuit of women. Some zmaj are thought to be so engrossed in this activity to the extent that they abandon their duties protecting farmlands from bad weather. If the crops were destroyed by storms, villagers would gather to oust the zmaj from the houses of local women. The lust of the zmaj for mortal women is also a major theme in a Serbian folk tale known as The Tsarina Militza and the Zmaj of Yastrebatz.